Category: Philosophical Topic

An Introduction to Political Philosophy by Jonathan Wolff

Title: An Introduction to Political Philosophy Author: Jonathan Wolff Publisher: Oxford University Press ISBN: 9780199296095  This book offers a clear overview of some of the main issues in political philosophy. It is written and structured in such a way that it is accessible without being unintelligent or inaccurate. Teachers might use the book to familiarise […]

Legal Rights

Title: Matthew Kramer on Legal Rights Location: http://philosophybites.com/2008/07/matthew-kramer.html In this audio clip (15:01), Matthew Kramer explains legal rights – what rights are, and what they are for. He discusses the difference between rights and liberties, and also explains the difference between will and interest theories. He also offers a number of examples to illustrate these […]

Human Rights by Andrew Clapham

Title: Human Rights: A Very Short Introduction Author: Andrew Clapham Publisher: Oxford University Press ISBN: 9780199205523  This short book is an accessible resource for teachers. The book is probably, as a whole, too complex for most high school students. Teachers might use it primarily to familiarise themselves with the debates surrounding human rights. There are, […]

Censorship

John Stuart Mill in On Liberty, chapter two, argues that we should never censor ideas, either true or false. This is a complex section and will require teaching assistance for older students to understand the language Mill uses, but the ideas are simple to understand and consider further.

Media Ethics censorship

What is appropriate to say on television? Below are links to two videos of Paul Henry, a controversial television presenter. The first is where Henry cannot pronounce the name of a person correctly and ends up in fits of laughter. The second, the more controversial, is the discussion with Prime Minister John Key, where Henry […]

Attack on Freedom of Speech NZ

Wiki news site describing why some critics have claimed the amendment to the Electorate Finance Act curbs our liberties to speech because individuals and groups of kiwis will face restrictions on what they can say for or against a political party. Is this an attack on freedom of speech?

Freedom of Speech in NZ historically

Philosophy Resource Managing | Home This site describes the freedom of speech laws, or lack thereof, in NZ historically and as such provides a useful background information for students discussing freedom of speech as an ethical or political topic.

Freedom of Speech an Introduction

This is a very useful, although slightly technical, website to look at the main reasons why we care about freedom of speech and the main defense thereof, by John Stuart Mill. Subsequent sections look at why offense, not direct harm, can itself be a reason to curb our liberties to speech as we choose.