Category: John Stuart Mill

Something to Prove: philosophy, community of inquiry & creative thinking

Something to Prove is an introduction to philosophy and the practice of community of inquiry (COI). Researched and written specifically for young adults and their teachers, it pokes an exploratory finger into the areas of metaphysics, epistemology, aesthetics, political ideology, formal reasoning, ethics, culture, freedom, and more. The book employs contemporary story-telling techniques, informal language, […]

Introducing Political Philosophy

This book introduces some of the main issues in political philosophy. It is focused on the ideas of particular thinkers (rather than on the ideas to which various thinkers have contributed); it also makes an attempt at historical narrative. Students would find this book – replete with illustrations – relatively easy to engage with, although […]

An Introduction to Political Philosophy by Colin Bird

Title: An Introduction to Political Philosophy Editor: Colin Bird Publisher: Cambridge ISBN: 9780521544825 Each chapter of this book looks at an important issue in political philosophy. Some of the issues discussed (and, hence some of the chapters, are more accessible than others. Teachers could use this book to come to terms with the major issues […]

An Introduction to Political Philosophy by Jonathan Wolff

Title: An Introduction to Political Philosophy Author: Jonathan Wolff Publisher: Oxford University Press ISBN: 9780199296095  This book offers a clear overview of some of the main issues in political philosophy. It is written and structured in such a way that it is accessible without being unintelligent or inaccurate. Teachers might use the book to familiarise […]


John Stuart Mill in On Liberty, chapter two, argues that we should never censor ideas, either true or false. This is a complex section and will require teaching assistance for older students to understand the language Mill uses, but the ideas are simple to understand and consider further.

Freedom of Speech an Introduction

This is a very useful, although slightly technical, website to look at the main reasons why we care about freedom of speech and the main defense thereof, by John Stuart Mill. Subsequent sections look at why offense, not direct harm, can itself be a reason to curb our liberties to speech as we choose.